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SPECIAL TOPIC COURSES - FALL 2016

ACCT 483-1:  ACCOUNTING ETHICS
In-depth discussions of ethical decision-making and obligations of accounting professionals.  Examination of issues related to ethical reasoning; creation of ethical and effective corporate governance structure; professional ethical codes; legal, regulatory and professional obligations; and corporate social responsibility.  Prerequisite:  ACCT 301.

BIOL 396-7:   MARINE BIOLOGY
Survey of the major topics in Marine Biology.  Upon course completion students will have an in-depth understanding of the diversity and evolution of marine organisms, ecological and trophic interactions in the sea, the roles of physical oceanographic prcoesses and properties play in the distribution of marine life, and characteristics of the major marine ecosystems.  Learning materials will include textbook readings, primary literature, and the latest news articles in the field of marine biology.  One intertidal field assignment may be required. Field trips will vary, and may include investigations of local marine habitats and attendance at a Perspectives in Ocean Science lecture.
Prerequisites: BIOL 201 and 211.

BIOL 486-4:   MOLECULAR MEDICINE AND MECHANISMS OF DISEASE
BIOL 686-4:   ADVANCED MOLECULAR MEDICINE AND MECHANISMS OF DISEASE
Provides an in-depth analysis of molecular medicine and advances in the field taught through a combination of didactic methods and the use of case studies.  Topics include basic principles of molecular medicine, discoveries in cellular and molecular biology, disease mechanisms and development, clinical research, biomedical ethics, and personalized medicine.  Presents an overview of the process from basic science discovery to therapeutic or vaccine approval using practical aspects of specific case studies.
Prerequisites for BIOL 486-4:  BIOL 351 or BIOL 352 or BIOL 353 or BIOT 355 or BIOL 477.
Prerequisites for BIOL 686-4:  Enrollment restricted to students with graduate standing.

BIOL 486-5:   DEVELOPMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY
BIOL 686-5:   ADVANCED DEVELOPMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY
Provides an in-depth analysis of developmental physiology. Takes a strong comparative approach, using examples of many different animal groups to convey important concepts in how animal function develops, how development it is influenced by the environment, and how development in other animals can inform us about human development and disease. Taught through a combination of lectures and the use of case studies to provide an overview of the basics of developmental biology, the link between development, physiology and evolution, the interaction between the environment and physiology during development, phenotypic plasticity, and how physiological systems develop. Specific subjects will include embryonic gas exchange, developmental energy use, development of thermoregulation and cardiovascular function, and ecotoxicology.
Prerequisite for BIOL 486-5:  BIOL 353. The course will be offered with an optional laboratory BIOL 487-1. Prerequisites for BIOL 686-5:  Enrollment restricted to students with graduate standing.

BIOL 487-1:  DEVELOPMENTAL PHYSIOLOGY LAB
Provides hands-on experience with experimental techniques for examining developmental physiology across a range of animal taxa.  Examine, handle and stage developing animals and undertake measurements of physiological functions, including respiration and cardiovascular function; assess phenotypic responses to altered environmental conditions, and perform eco-toxicological assays. Design and conduct experiments, perform analyses and present the results in written and oral forms.
Prerequisite:  BIOL 353.  Co-requisite:  BIOL 486-5. 

BIOL 686-6:  EXPLAINING RESEARCH AND RESEARCH METHODS IN BIOTECHNOLOGY
Provides background information and necessary laboratory techniques related to biotechnology. Upon course completion students will be proficient in necessary laboratory skills for success in future coursework and experiences in industry.  Course includes both lecture and wet laboratory components to reinforce both theoretical and practical aspects of skills used in the field of biotechnology.
Prerequisite for BIOL 686-6: Enrollment is restricted to students who have been admitted to the Master of Biotechnology Program.

ECON 481-9: URBAN AND REGIONAL ECONOMICS
Economics studies the distribution of scarce resources.  This class will study one scare resource in particular: space.  Examines how people's economic activity is distributed across space, the location decisions of firms and households, and the role that government plays in urban planning and public policy problems.  Includes the formation of cities, land-use patterns, sprawl, transportation, housing, provision of public goods, crime, education, poverty, urban employment, and urban growth.
Prerequisites:  ECON 201 and 202.

EDST 633-6:  VIDEO GAMES, LITERACY, AND LEARNING
Video games are among the most popular technology among youth with children ages 8 to 18 playing video games daily. The interactive and engaging nature of video games has caught the attention of educators. Explores how popular video games such as Minecraft can be used to support children’s learning in educational settings. Learn the history of video games, and the use of this medium for education purposes. Includes hands-on experiences with games, analysis of video games from an educational technology perspective, and designing of video games for teaching and learning.

ENVS 390-1:  ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
An interdisciplinary examination of fundamental environmental problems faced by individuals and communities of color.  Considers the proposition that people of color and socio-economically disadvantaged individuals, whether residing in urban or rural communities, bear a disproportionate burden of environmental pollution and its health consequences.

GBST 390-7:  WATER, POWER AND GLOBAL POLITICS
Explores the interaction between water, power, and wealth within countries.  Examines water scarcity as a source of conflict in a variety of regions of the world with special emphasis on the Middle East and California.  By comparing the economic, political and social impacts of water scarcity in California with those in other arid regions of the world, students will learn that peoples living in arid countries face common challenges, regardless of level of development, wealth or culture. 

HIST 300-12:  WITCHCRAFT AND HERESY IN MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN EUROPE
Explores the rise of heretical movements, including witchcraft, and its persecution by orthodox authorities in pre-modern Europe.  Focuses on historical explanations for these movements and their persecution.  Treats orthodox (both Roman Catholic and Protestant) responses to the rise in heresy and witchcraft through preaching and violence.  Special attention given to the socio-economic, cultural (including gender relations), religious, and political developments that triggered these heterodox persecutions.

HIST 300-13:  THE SURPRISING HISTORY OF THE FORK AND OTHER STRANGE OBJECTS: MATERIAL CULTURE, HUMAN SOCIETIES, AND DIGITAL HISTORY
Explores the history of objects through readings, lectures, videos, and discussions that will provide historical context and introduce methods of analyzing and interpreting objects as sources of information about and representations of human experiences and processes of historical change.

ID 170-4: FOOD WORLDS: STUDIES IN COMPARATIVE NATIONAL CUISINES
Interdisciplinary study of the geography of “national cuisines” from select countries around the world with an emphasis on the social, cultural, economic, geographic, historical and political currents shaping national patterns and practices of eating.

ID 360-4:  DISNEY ANIMATED FILMS: A SMALL WORLD AFTER ALL
Since the 1937 release of Snow White, Disney animated films have entertained millions of children and families around the world.  Explores issues of representation in Disney movies, with a special focus on social constructions of culture, notions of identity and difference, and the whirlpool of contradictory messages embedded in Disney animated films.  Students will watch Disney movies with a critical eye, complete a set of academic readings, and develop their analytical skills as cultural consumers.

ID 370-16:  THE HUNGER GAMES: MAY THE ODDS BE EVER IN YOUR FAVOR
Examines a range of political and social justice issues that arise in the Hunger Games series, including classism, social privilege, governmental control, political resistance, rebellion and social change movements, the effects of war, gender roles and relations, societal emphasis on appearances and “fashion,” hunger and food distribution, and what happens when the wealthy and powerful control society.  Explores these subjects through analysis of the texts and films, applying a range of social science theories to them, and comparing their findings to contemporary U.S. society.

ID 370-17:  INTRODUCTION TO ONLINE JOURNALISM
Provides hands-on introduction to the basic skills of reporting and writing for the web to develop digital-first journalists.  Covers the theory and practice of online journalism, including writing, editing, publishing, and updating digital news stories.  Emphasizes production of digital content for student news outlets using individual and group-based multimedia projects.

ID 401-1, 401-2, 401-3:  CAREER READINESS AND PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATON (1-3 units)
Increases the career readiness of the graduates of the College of Humanities, Arts, Behavioral and Social Sciences by expanding the range of career options for graduates, improving the connection between the college and community members, and encouraging faculty to be leaders in pedagogy and curriculum regarding career readiness in the liberal arts.

KINE 390-9:  HEALTHY AGING
Focuses on promoting health in older adults through tools in kinesiology.  Examines how to access and engage cognitive, motor and cardiovascular functions in older adults through group and individual interactions.  Interactions with older adults in the community through assisting in providing fall prevention, brain fitness, and cardiovascular health activities.  Provide needed services to the community; learn to work with different populations in the process.  Prerequisites:  KINE 301 or 326.

LTWR 502-4:  STUDIES IN HORROR
Explores a range of masterworks in horror fiction from past to present as well as emerging sub-genres and popular horror titles.  Covers horror genre theories and scholarship.  Considers the cultural significance of the horror genre, its aesthetics, and its roots in folkloric and gothic literary traditions.  Prerequisite for undergraduates:  Completion of LTWR 300A and 300B and at least nine (9) additional units of LTWR courses at the 300 or 400-level.

MASS 470-3:  CRITICAL APPROACHES TO CHILDREN’S MEDIA
Examines the landscape of children's media form a critical media and cultural studies perspective. Through the communication circuit of production, text, explores the complexities of children's media, introducing students to the major debates surrounding the role of media in the lives and development of children here in the US and around the globe. Looks at television shows, films, video, books, video games, new media apps, and other media aimed at children, paying special attention to issues of gender, class, race, political economy, and globalization.  The media will be supplementary; heavily focused on critical theory. Perquisites: COMM 100, COMM 200 and MASS 301.

MASS 470-5:  MOBILE MEDIA CULTURES
Explores the history of mobile media technologies, convergence of old and new media, the shift towards a mobile society, mobile technologies and social protest, mobile technologies and intimacies, the different uses of mobile media around the world, and much more.

MKTG 484-3:  DIGITAL MARKETING TACTICS
Examines how digital media has changed marketing and explores detailed marketing tactics for evolving platforms such as mobile apps, websites, search engines, and email.  Integrates digital tools to meaningfully engage consumers.  Utilizes specific digital marketing resources to achieve specific goals that support an organization’s defined mission.
Prerequisite:  MKTG 302

MUSC 180-3:  WIND ENSEMBLE
Students will learn and perform standard high school and college-level band repertoire.  This will include classical literature transcribed from orchestral works, Americana, and contemporary pop tunes set for large ensemble.  Rehearsals will be held once a week for a three-hour block; and sectionals will be held for 1/2 hour each week.  Performances will be held on the CSUSM campus, as well as throughout North County in conjunction with local high schools, libraries, and community centers.  Enrollment Requirement:  Students must have the ability to read music.  Restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor.

MUSC 380-2:  A HISTORY OF JAZZ
Surveys the major innovators, stylists, and historical settings of jazz music.  Demonstrates, through an analysis of the music-culture of various periods of jazz history, how disciplines (sociology, political science, cognitive science), ideas (improvisation), issues (race and gender) and knowledge (Great Migration) are interrelated, intersecting and interconnected.

NURS 596-4:  ADVANCED PRACTICE TRANSITIONS OF CARE OF PATIENTS AND FAMILIES I
Exploration of Transitions of Care concepts with emphasis of the evolution and core principles of nursing case management.  Contemporary case management models across the health care continuum are analyzed.  Case management competencies for beginner and advanced nursing practice will be studied.  A major focus is identifying strategies that promote appropriate clinical outcomes of care, coordination of care, and cost-efficient utilization of resources using a systems perspective.  Enrollment limited to admission to CNS Program.  Prerequisites: NURS 502, 503A.  Co-requisite:  NURS 596-5.

NURS 596-5:  FIELD STUDY: ADVANCED PRACTICE TRANSITIONS OF CARE
Clinical practicum for immersion in the Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) role in transitions of care nursing for patients and families in acute care and community settings.  By providing direct patient care, CNS's influence care outcomes through expert consultation and implementing improvements in health care delivery systems. Students will be mentored by an Advanced Practice Nurse.  The minimum requirement for the practicum is 180 hours.   Enrollment limited to admission to CNS Program. Prerequisites: NURS 502, 503A; Co-requisite: NURS 596-4.

OM 482-1:  STRATEGIC SUPPLY CHAIN COST MANAGEMENT
Focuses on the fundamental principles, processes, tools, strategies and practices that are currently used by successful companies to manage their supply chain costs and networks, and significantly improve their bottom lines.  Analyzes business needs, markets and suppliers, evaluates category costs and rationalizes supplier prices.  Develops and implements effective supply chain management strategies that balance cost, quality, technology and delivery to achieve the lowest total cost of ownership.
Prerequisites:  BUS 204 or 304

PHIL 390-1:  FEMINIST ETHICS
Feminist ethics is the attempt to identify the role of sexual difference in philosophical inquiry and examine the causes of sexual injustice in our culture, institutions, and politics.  We will read feminist thinkers with radically different agendas and focus on the various methodologies of feminist critique in order to better grasp the breadth and influence of this historical development in contemporary philosophy.  Some readings will be abstract and theoretical while others will engage controversial issues of interest to feminist thinkers, such as pornography, prostitution, sexual violence, issues of body image and beauty, sexual orientation, reproductive rights, and eco-feminism.  (Cross-listed with WMST 300-14)

PHYS 390-1: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL PHYSICS
Introduction to numerical techniques for solving and visualizing non-analytical physics problems.  Material from Physics 201 and 202 will be used as a springboard to solve physics problems using a variety of numerical techniques.  Particular attention will be placed on importing and visualization of data, numerical integration and differentiation, residuals, plotting 3-D data, including vectors using industry-standard commercial software packages like Matlab and Labview.  Introduction to data acquisition as well as Monte-Carlo simulations in physics will also be included.  Intended to provide students with a skill set that will help them in upper-division physics courses and research projects. Prerequisites: CS 111, MATH 160 and 162. PHYS 201 and 202.

PSCI 390-10:  MODERN POLITICAL THEORY
Introduces a number of concepts and arguments which have frequently been associated with modern political thought. The State-citizen relationship, individual rights and liberties, history as a process of human progress, revolution, and alienation are among the subjects which will be surveyed. Discusses original texts by a number of theorists including Immanuel Kant, Frederick Nietzsche, Benjamin Constant, and Jose Ortega y Gasset. Encourages an understanding of the relationship among modern political theories. Further, encourages the use of these theories and critical thinking to come up with analysis of various contemporary political issues and problems.

PSCI 390-11: GENDER GLOBAL POLITICS THROUGH FILM
Gender Global Politics Through Film Introduces students to contemporary global issues and problems by placing women at the center of our analysis.  Using comparative methods and film analysis to explain and discuss important topics in global politics, students will examine some of the most pressing political, social, environmental and economic problems that women currently face around the world.  (cross-listed with WMST 300-15).

PSCI 390-20:   PRESIDENTIAL POLICY AND IMMIGRATION
Designed to provide an in-depth study of U.S. presidential policy concerning immigration.  Covers the policy process involving immigration, which includes problem identification, getting the issue on the agenda, policy formulation, policy adoption, and policy evaluation.  Additionally the role of the Office of the President, interest groups, and the media will be investigated in determining their involvement in the policy process for immigration.  Provides a broad perspective of past and contemporary presidential policies on immigration with the focus on contemporary policies.  Includes the proposed policies concerning immigration of the current 2016 Presidential candidates running for office.

PSYC 440-4:  THE PSYCHOLOGY OF SENSATION AND PERCEPTION
Studies ways in which humans (and other animals) take in stimulation from the environment (sensation) and process that information (perception).  Survey the major senses (e.g., sight, hearing, touch, etc.) from how the environmental stimulus is first processed by the sense organ to how the brain interprets the patterns of stimulation.  These complicated pathways constrain the processing of the stimulus in certain ways, affecting the eventual interpretation of the stimulus.  More importantly, once delivered to the brain, the information undergoes huge transformations.  These transformations allow humans (and other animals) the ability to process an ever-changing array of stimuli.  Prerequisite:  PSYC 100

SOC 490-10:  SEXUALITIES AND THE LAW
Explores various ways sexualities are regulated by the State as well as the socially constructed nature of sexualities through the lens of criminalization (ie. sodomy and sex work) as well as through policy and laws regulating sexuality like age of consent, marriage, immigration and sexual assault.  Emphasis on how sexuality as a site of oppression is impacted by race, gender, socio-economic status, age, ability, and nationality.

VPA 180-4:  INTRODUCTION TO GRAPHIC DESIGN
Covers the basics of software that integrates two-dimensional graphic design, photography, and web applications.  Teaches the basics of graphic design.  Develops skills in using the tools to create projects that integrate these basic principles resulting in print and web applications.

VPA 180-5:  PRE-20TH CENTURY ART HISTORY: THEMES IN ART FROM ANTIQUITY TO THE ENLIGHTENMENT
A thematic approach to art history from ancient times to modernity.  Explores the role of art in public spaces, the concepts of nature in art as well as the intersection of art with other areas of knowledge such as math, science, and humanities.  Provides preparation for upper division courses such as art and social change, art and science, etc.

VPA 180-6: INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL AND MEDIA ARTS
Focus on the political, cultural and artistic developments and debates related to the many media art forms that have developed from the nineteenth century through the early twenty-first century; from early forms of print and photography to contemporary media including video and computer art.

VSAR 380-1:  DATA VISUALIZATION
Provides the technological tools for telling the story of information, using techniques and principles from art and design.  An examination of how communicative strategies, such as flow charts, idea maps, graphics, animations, movies and performances, can convey complex subject-specific information.  Emphasizes translating data in multiple media and stretching the story-telling potential of information plotting.

WMST 300-14:  FEMINIST ETHICS
Feminist ethics is the attempt to identify the role of sexual difference in philosophical inquiry and examine the causes of sexual injustice in our culture, institutions, and politics.  We will read feminist thinkers with radically different agendas and focus on the various methodologies of feminist critique in order to better grasp the breadth and influence of this historical development in contemporary philosophy.  Some readings will be abstract and theoretical while others will engage controversial issues of interest to feminist thinkers, such as pornography, prostitution, sexual violence, issues of body image and beauty, sexual orientation, reproductive rights, and eco-feminism.  (Cross-listed with PHIL 390-1)

WMST 300-15:  GENDER GLOBAL POLITICS THROUGH FILM
Introduces students to contemporary global issues and problems by placing women at the center of our analysis.  Using comparative methods and film analysis to explain and discuss important topics in global politics, students will examine some of the most pressing political, social, environmental and economic problems that women currently face around the world.  (cross-listed with PSCI 390-11)

WMST 300-22:  WOMEN AND RELIGION
Explores the place and power of women within the major religious traditions of the world, including Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, and Indigenous traditions.  Addresses issues of women and religion, among them how sacred texts define women and gender relations, the ways women have been included and excluded--as participants and leaders in the formal structures and everyday practices of major religions, and how feminists have theorized the treatment and agency of women in religious traditions.

WMST 300-23:  REPRESENTATIONS IN POPULAR DISCOURSE:  OBJECTS OF DESIRE AND DENIGRATION
Analyzes ideological representations of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, physical ability, class and/or faith in contemporary popular discourse through a feminist lens.   Involves critique of and personal reflection on such discourse.  Read and discuss popular discourse, including articles, cartoons, videos, personal essays, fiction, and narrative nonfiction, to identify ideological representations of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, physical ability, class and/or faith. Examine how the representations are constructed using rhetorical devices, and how encoded messages relay to the reader.

 

Information provided by the Office of Catalog & Curriculum
Posted April 4, 2016