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Topics Courses

SPECIAL TOPIC COURSES - SPRING 2017

CHEM 494-1: INTERMOLECULAR INTERACTIONS

Review of the major intermolecular interactions that contribute to the chemical and physical properties of chemical compounds and molecular aggregates. Includes an analysis of dispersion, dipole-dipole, and hydrogen bonding interactions, but will also include others that are not introduced in the typical chemistry and biochemistry courses.  Applications to inorganic, organic, and biochemical systems will be emphasized. 

Prerequisites: CHEM 202, MATH 162, PHYS 202 (added 9/14/16)

COMM 350-3: ORGANIZATIONAL COMMUNICATION ETHICS

Examines ethical questions that impact how organizations communicate and what they choose to relay and omit to their various audiences.  Considers personal ethical decision-making processes taking place in workers everyday lives.  Explores theories on ethics as well as approaches that engage important questions of power, equality and justice.

COMM 450-1: COMMUNICATION AND TRANSNATIONALISM
Examines the communication practices that occur across transnational borders in the context of globalization.  Explores transnationalism as the multiple ties and interactions linking peoples and institutions across the borders of nation states.  Overviews various theories, approaches, and concepts to the study of transnationalism in the field of critical intercultural communication to help students develop the ability to effectively communicate across and through cultural differences in order to become global citizens in a transnational context. 

Prerequisite:  COMM 330.

CS 497-5:  RECONFIGURABLE EMBEDDED SYSTEMS 

Covers concepts, technologies, and programming languages used in modern digital embedded systems.  Subjects include general-purpose computing, reconfigurable computing, and application-specific computing in digital system design.  Covers technologies of reconfigurable computing systems such as FPGAs, design flow and implementation in reconfigurable systems, Hardware Description Languages (HELs), especially VHDL programming, techniques to reconfigure systems over time including partitioning and placement, and on-chip communication solutions in dynamically reconfigurable systems. 

Prerequisite:  CS 331

CS 697-1: THE INTERNET OF THINGS

Topics include: networked embedded systems, sensor technologies, security issues in IoT environment, appcessory programming on smartphones, and network connectivity using low energy communication protocols such as BLE. High-level programming tools will be introduced as a way to integrate the entire system, with demonstrator applications such as a smartphone remote controlled sensor station.

ECON 481-10: APPLIED ECONOMETRICS

Provides the tools necessary to estimate and interpret causal relationships in observational data when the assumptions of standard least squares techniques are violated. Topics include the endogenous independent variables, panel data, binary dependent variables, censored data, selection bias, count data, ordered response data, multinomial response data, treatment effects estimation and time series data. Emphasis will be placed on application of the statistical techniques to data and the interpretation of results.

EDT 633-1:  G SUITE FOR EDUCATION

Introduces educators to G Suite for Education (formerly Google Apps for Education), as it is becoming more and more pervasive in School districts. Teaches effective and efficient use, and implementation of G Suite in the school setting to facilitate learning, skill acquisition, and motivation.

GBST 390-6: POLITICS AND CONFLICT IN SYRIA (cross-listed with PSCI 390-19)

Focus on the origins and political dynamics of Syria's ongoing civil war.  Covers the political history needed to understand contemporary Syrian politics, with a particular emphasis on the period from 1970 to 2010.  Explores the causes behind the 2011 popular uprising against President Bashar al-Asad and examines how the uprising transformed into an armed rebellion against the Asad regime.  Analyzes the roles that external factors such as Saudi Arabia, the U.S., Russia and the Islamic State have played in the ongoing conflict as well as the impact that growing numbers of Syrian refugees are having on Syria's neighbors and countries in the European Union.

PSCI 390-19 is also offered as GBST 390-6. Students may not receive credit for both.

GRMN 314-1: 20TH CENTURY GERMAN CULTURE

Survey of German Culture from the time of unification through reunification. Uses a variety of German Language genres, including music, film, poetry, and prose fiction to examine cultural and intellectual trends leading to wars and conflicts as well as how German society dealt with the aftermath of these events. Taught in German.

Prerequisite: GRMN 201

HIST 300-10:  THEMATIC TOPICS IN HISTORY: THE CRUSADES
Explores the evolution of the Crusades from 1095 until the conquest of Granada in 1492. Emphasis placed on the Christian military campaigns in the Middle East (Jerusalem and the wider Levant).  Themes include society and demography, trade and economy, religious and cultural encounters (Christianity/Islam), intellectual exchange, military history, and colonization. Addresses the implications of the crusades in the modern world and contemporary events.

HIST 300-11:  THEMATIC TOPICS IN HISTORY: THE SPANISH PAST AND THE MODERN MIDDLE EAST 

Explores the legacy of Islamic Spain on the modern Middle East.  Topics include Spanish Jewish communities in the modern Middle East; how terrorist groups remember Islamic Spain; the role of Islamic Spain in contemporary Islamic culture; how the Islamic past is remembered in modern Spain.

HIST 300-14:  BEER IN THE UNITED STATES: A SOCIAL, BUSINESS, AND CULTURAL HISTORY

Studies the place of beer in United States. Illustrates a number of crucial themes in American history--immigration, changing expectations of gender, the dramatic transformations that came with large scale urbanization and industrialization, the religious and moral impulse to rid society of its vices, the impact of consumer culture on what we eat and drink, and finally--of special interest to our region--the increasing importance of California and the west coast in shaping the tastes of the nation as a whole.

ID 170-5:  INTRODUCTION TO ORIGINS OF CHICANXS STUDIES

Interdisciplinary overview of the Chicanx historical experience in the United States. Emphasis on historical perspectives and the impact of key social institutions and socio-political, education/intellectual, psychological, economic, technological, and cultural developments. Surveys historical origins and examines complex and interrelated developments within contemporary Chicanx communities in the United States. Course covers select historical periods shaping Chicanx culture and American history and how they related to contemporary Chicanx experiences and conditions. Students apply multiple theoretical perspectives and methodologies in written classwork, class discussions, and written examinations.

MASS 470-4: MEDIA AND MIXED REALITY

Introduces how digital culture interacts with mixed reality.  Mixed reality is an emerging research field integrating physical and digital environments into a mixed physical and digital reality.  Students will be invited to think critically and creatively about the concepts, theories, and its technological applications that are essential for better understanding future media based on mixed reality technologies.

MGMT 482-6:  INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT

Explores the importance of international business management in the context of international human resource management, including topics on culture, compensation and benefits, international organizations and their structures, international assignment management and the legal and regulatory considerations that global organizations face. Students identify differences in operating a domestic versus and international business and how business practices need to be adapted to operate successfully in foreign markets.

MIS 484-5:  WEB DEVELOPMENT AND BUSINESS ANALYTICS APPLICATIONS

Introduces popular programming languages and frameworks for web development and business analytics. Covers several web development tools, including wix, Flash, Django, etc. Students will apply embedded collaborative filtering, machine learning, artificial neural networks, deep learning packages to solve common business problems, such as recommendation systems, churn prediction, insurance fraud detection, etc.

MKTG 484-4: MARKETING ANALYTICS

Introduction to understanding, applying, interpreting, and documenting analytic concepts to make data-driven marketing decisions. Provides the conceptual and technical foundations of various marketing metrics and research methods. Help students acquire practical marketing skills in data analysis via hands-on experience. Students will learn how to use excel to summarize marketing data, understand what customers want, determine customer value, perform market segmentation and get insights from networked social data.

Prerequisites:  MKTG 302, and BUS 204 or 304.

MUSC 180-3:  WIND ENSEMBLE

Students will learn and perform standard high school and college-level band repertoire.  This will include classical literature transcribed from orchestral works, Americana, and contemporary pop tunes set for large ensemble.  Rehearsals will be held once a week for a three-hour block; and sectionals will be held for 1/2 hour each week.  Performances will be held on the CSUSM campus, as well as throughout North County in conjunction with local high schools, libraries, and community centers.  Enrollment Requirement:  Students must have the ability to read music.  Restricted to students who have obtained consent of instructor.
OM 484-2:  WAREHOUSING AND DISTRIBUTION MANAGEMENT

Topics include, but are not limited to, the relation between supply chain networks and facility operations, layout design, material handling systems, storage and order picking methods, warehouse management systems, and operations benchmarking. Focuses on different aspects of warehouse operation and design. Covers related topics such as e-commerce logistics, maritime logistics, retail logistics, and marketing logistics.

PSCI 390-2: SEMINAR IN WOMEN'S STUDIES: WOMEN IN U.S. POLITICS (crosslisted as WMST 300-4)

Introduces Political Science majors and non-majors to the experience of women in United States politics.  While the political rights of women in the U.S. have evolved a great deal, women candidates, officeholders, and leaders still face unique difficulties in the political realm.  Discusses the evolution of citizenship and political rights of women in the U.S. and analyzes the womens political movements that pushed for these rights.  Examines womens experiences as voters, activists, candidates, officeholders, and political leaders.  Examines several case studies of women¿s ascensions and candidacies for various levels of office and their treatment of peers, the media, political parties, and their opponents.  Discusses the intersection of race, ethnicity, sexuality, and class with gender to further understand the complex political experiences of all women in the United States.  This course carries General Education certification in area DD.

May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for WMST 300-4.

PSCI 390-11:  TOPICS IN PSCI: GENDER GLOBAL POLITICS THROUGH FILM (cross-listed WMST 300-15)

Introduces students to contemporary global issues and problems by placing women at the center of our analysis.  Using comparative methods and film analysis to explain and discuss important topics in global politics, students will examine some of the most pressing political, social, environmental and economic problems that women currently face around the world.

PSCI 390-19:  POLITICS AND CONFLICT IN SYRIA (cross-listed with GBST 390-6)

Focus on the origins and political dynamics of Syria's ongoing civil war.  Covers the political history needed to understand contemporary Syrian politics, with a particular emphasis on the period from 1970 to 2010.  Explores the causes behind the 2011 popular uprising against President Bashar al-Asad and examines how the uprising transformed into an armed rebellion against the Asad regime.  Analyzes the roles that external factors such as Saudi Arabia, the U.S., Russia and the Islamic State have played in the ongoing conflict as well as the impact that growing numbers of Syrian refugees are having on Syria's neighbors and countries in the European Union.

PSCI 390-19 is also offered as GBST 390-6. Students may not receive credit for both.

PSCI 390-21:  POLITICAL VIOLENCE
Introduction to literature on political violence, emphasizing the causes and consequences of conflict, and the ways in which reconstruction can be meaningfully pursued in its aftermath. Includes country-specific studies spanning sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and the Middle East. Covers five main forms of conflict: civil wars, genocide, communal riots, terrorism, and electoral violence as well selected topics on post-conflict reconstruction.

PSYC 440-2:  PSYCHOLOGY AND THE LAW

Course examines the interaction of law with cognitive, developmental, clinical, and social psychology.  Explores the scientific knowledge that psychologists bring to the courtroom when they testify about a wide range of psychological issues, and focuses on research areas that need further empirical examination. Critically examines the legal standards that govern the admissibility of psychological expert testimony.  Discusses the policy implications of modifying the governing legal standards and the usefulness of psychological research.

SOC 489-10:  GEOSPATIAL ANALYSIS IN SOCIOLOGY

Hands-on experience applying geospatial analysis to sociological research.

SOC 685-5:  SEMINAR ON INFORMAL ECONOMIES AND IMMIGRANT COMMUNITIES

Explores the political economy of immigrant communities in the U.S., with an emphasis on income-generating practices of documented and undocumented immigrants. Discusses informal economic activities, legal and illegal, integral to the US political economy: e.g. unpaid household work; goods bartering; under-the-table construction work or day labor; drug sales. Analyzes structural arrangements of self-employment, flexible labor, and outsourced labor chains in the US and the San Diego borderlands region. Develops conceptual tools for understanding the immigrant workforce under global capitalism and the links between informal employment, structural poverty, and the expansion of global capitalism. Special emphasis on experiences of the vulnerable and deportable population of Latino/a immigrants.

VPA 380-24 EXPERIMENTAL MEDIA PRODUCTION

Students will study various forms of experimental cinema and video.  They will produce several short experimental hi-definition digital productions that explore sounds and image relationships, narrative and non-narrative structures.

VPA 380-29: TEACHING DANCING IN THE COMMUNITY

Focus on theoretical and practical understanding of dance pedagogy and dance activism.  Presents an academic approach to the subject and addresses the meaningfulness of an artistic and intelligent dance education.  Working collaboratively, students will design curriculum and have the unique opportunity to teach within the local community. (This is being offered in place of DNCE 440.)

VSAR 380-2:  DESIGN AND INVENTION

Explores methods of creative development from concept to visual design. Emphasizes the imagination as a tool for invention with visual design as the conduit for both the development and articulation of new concepts. Incorporates studio-based hands-on development and a range of computer graphics technologies. Draws on historical and contemporary examples of invention with an emphasis on the interdisciplinary development of ideas. Explores ways in which design concepts can be realized through design thinking and project work. Includes design activities, research, design management

WMST 300-4: SEMINAR IN WOMEN'S STUDIES: WOMEN IN U.S. POLITICS (crosslisted as PSCI 390-2)

Introduces Women’s Studies majors and non-majors to the experience of women in United States politics.  While the political rights of women in the U.S. have evolved a great deal, women candidates, officeholders, and leaders still face unique difficulties in the political realm.  Discusses the evolution of citizenship and political rights of women in the U.S. and analyzes the women’s political movements that pushed for these rights.  Examines women’s experiences as voters, activists, candidates, officeholders, and political leaders.  Examines several case studies of women’s ascensions and candidacies for various levels of office and their treatment of peers, the media, political parties, and their opponents.  Discusses the intersection of race, ethnicity, sexuality, and class with gender to further understand the complex political experiences of all women in the United States.  This course carries General Education certification in area DD.

May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for PSCI 390-2.

WMST 300-21:  ECO-FEMINISM

Introduction to ecological feminism - eco-feminism or "green feminism.

Examines the ways in which feminist thought and feminist movements have prioritized the environment, focused on the relationships of men and women to the natural world, and engaged a range of environmental issues, ranging from pollution and toxic waste, resource exhaustion, and species extinction and animal rights, to health, economic development, and the politics of food. Explores the important contributions of varied ecofeminism perspectives, including: critiques of the parallel oppression of women and nature, multiple hierarchies of domination, and the gendered effects of environmental problems; the reframing of militarism, corporate globalization, and technology as environmental issues; and the promotion of distinctive feminist alternatives, including sustainability, earth democracy, and spirituality.