Theater


THEATRE ART COURSES

TA 120 (3) - Introduction to Theatre
An introduction to the language of theatre through a comparative study of various theatre styles and cultures. Emphasis will be placed on production design, acting, direction, how theatre is constructed and performed, and the social and cultural context in which it is created. Includes theatre from across the globe including that of Europe, Asia, Africa, and Americas. Through watching plays and analysis, students will learn the fundamentals of theatre and search for relationships between and commonalties among the cultures studied.
      
TA 300 (3) - Storytelling Society
Designed to demonstrate how storytelling can be used to address social issues. The class will use real-life controversy – one relevant to this community – as a base. Students will do substantial research on a chosen topic/issue and then use that information to write and perform a play. Students will be encouraged to be creative; to experience with non-traditional formats of stage production. Not all students will perform in the play. However, all students will be involved in mounting the production by way of design, dramaturgy, stage management or technical design. The final goal of the course is to have the play performed for the community. A post play discussion will follow each performance. Two hour lecture and two hours of laboratory.
      
TA 301 (3) - Acting
A studio class centered around the student’s practice of basic acting techniques. Each student will be required to prepare a mono-logue and a scene to be performed in class. Basic approaches to theatrical movement and voice will be explored.
      
TA 302 (3) - Movement for Actors
Through Western and non-Western approaches, student will work on developing a physical awareness for stage work, including spatial awareness, directing energy, and ensemble development.
            
TA 305 (4) - Design and Production for Theatre
An introduction through lecture, demonstration, and practical hands-on experience of all four areas of theatrical design: scenic, costume, lighting, and sound. Students will serve as designers and technical crew for this semester's CSUSM theatre.
May repeatedfor a total of twelve (12), including any previous enrollment in VPA 380F.
      
TA 320 (3) - Modern World Theatre in Europe and Latin America
Through individual and group readings, students will study European and Latin American dramatic works. Focuses on the relationship between theatre in both form and content, and the society giving rise to a particular work. Works drawn from both the traditional and emerging canon will be examine in terms of acting style, content, imagery, and motive. Students will examine plays from other countries considering their perspectives, relevance and meaning to our won multicultural society in light of prevailing world conditions. Issues such as identity, gender, sexuality, race, class, community, and ethnicity will be analyzed through in-class discussions and library research.
      
TA 323 (3) - Power and Popular Culture
Through critical analysis of advertising, popular film, theatre, and television, this course offers an active interdisciplinary approach of exploring the way women, gays, ethnic minorities, and individuals of different classes are portrayed, allowed access, and share power within these mediums as both cultural expressions and fields of employment. The analysis of popular culture and the meaning it reflects in light of prevailing world conditions poses an awareness of the subsequent choices confronting individuals and communities in U.S. society. Issues of identity, gender, sexuality, race, class, community, and ethnicity will be considered not only for their cultural expression but as the mechanisms of larger world systems. Through individual and group readings, in-class discussions, and film showings, this course will provide ample opportunities for the development of in-depth research projects.
      
TA 325 (3) - Latino/Chicano Theatre in the United States
Through individual and group readings of specific works of theatre, this course will examine the role of Latino/Chicano Theatre as part of American Theatre as part of American Theatre and a distinct voice in World Theatre. Students will examine social, political, and aesthetic elements which have given rise to the development of Latino/Chicano theatre, including the struggle for justice, cultural and community integrity, biculturalism, bilingualism, identity, race, and cultural chauvinism. The perspectives and works of other Latino populations will be included as part of an examination of comparative and competing Latino world views with the United States. The course will include a performance aspect.
            
TA 328 (3) - Stage to Film
Through play readings, viewing selected films of plays and occasional attendance at performances, students will analyze and examine distinctions between theatre and film as they pertain to film adaptation. Students will compare and contrast aesthetic, economic, social, and political issues involved in the translation and adaptation of stage plays to film. Addresses the relevance of theatre as a medium focused on the delivery of human energy in relationship to film as a mechanized counterpart in an increasingly technologically focused society.
      
TA 401 (3) - Play and Screenwriting I
Introduces students to techniques used in the process of writing for the stage and the screen (film and television). Readings and guest lectures will complement the writing process in which students will be engaged. Issues of responsibility of the writer to his/her community will be addressed in relationship to the play/screen scripts viewed and read for class. Methods of analysis of the text and development of critical thought on the social issues surrounding the work will be discussed. Much emphasis will be placed on the fact that writing for the stage, screen or radio has little to do with written text on a page. Students will examine scripts and follows them form page to page by attending live performances and movies available locally.
May be repeated once for credit with a different instructor.
      
TA 410 (3) - Contemporary American Theatre – Society’s Taboos
Through individual and group readings, this course presents theatre written and performed as a document of society’s concerns. Analysis of representative dramatic pieces from different cultures and/or ethnic groups in the United States. Considers relevant historical, cultural, and philosophical perspectives and the meaning each work offers within the context of our multicultural society. Explores the relationship between art and politics through issues including identity, gender, sexuality, race, class, community, and ethnicity. This exploration will included in-class discussions, library research, and attendance at theatre events.
      
TA 420 (3) - Bilingual Theatre - Spanish/English
Bilingual Theatre — Spanish/English Through study and performance of bilingual texts, students will acquire practical and critical skills that will enable them to understand and employ techniques for working with a Mexican/American bilingual population. The phenomenon of bilingualism (English/Spanish) in the American Southwest will serve as the foreground for this interdisciplinary approach to theatre and performance. Plays will be examined within a historical context accounting for factors and perspectives that have shaped the use of language in our society including colonialism, migration, assimilation, acculturation, and cross-cultural interaction.
Two hours lecture and two hours theater activities. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 or equivalent.
      
TA 421 (3) - Viva el Teatro – Spanish Theatre in Performance
An active interdisciplinary approach to the study of theatre. Following the presentation of a historical and theoretical background, students will approach and analyze a variety of Spanish and Latin American plays both as works of literature and as theatre in performance. Students will acquire basic acting techniques as well as develop skill in literary analysis. Issues of gender, class, community,
and sexuality contained in the plays will be explored within an aesthetic context. Conducted primarily in Spanish. Also offered as SPAN 421. Students may not receive credit for both. Two hours of lecture and two hours of theatre activities. Recommended: TA 301.
      
TA 480 (3) - Theatre Activities for Children and Adults
Explores various modes of expression in the theatre arts through active in-class learning based on independent and group work. Students will gather material through library research, then analyze and synthesize material into texts for performances in the classroom and in the community. The material used in class provides for the examination and comparison of different cultural perspectives as seen through dramatic texts and theatrical exercises. These different cultural perspectives include an awareness of the changing conditions in our world and the role of theatre/art work as a voice and tool of understanding within this context. Provides students with a platform for self-examination and challenges within an aesthetic and cultural environment geared towards the nonprofessional. An emphasis will be placed on theatre activities that can be applied to the K-12 classroom.
May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for TA 480S. This course satisfies the Liberal Studies requirement for work in the Fine Arts and Humanities (Studio Arts). Two hours lecture
and two hours theatre activities.
      
TA 489 (4) - Production and Performance
Provides students with an engaging and practical experience essential for understanding and synthesizing theoretical and textual work in theatre arts. Students will participate in various aspects of play production including analysis acting, play development, library research, technical theatre, and audience development. Stage work includes rigorous interaction between student, professor,and the text.
May be repeated for a total of twelve (12) units. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for TA 489S.
      
TA 489S (4) - Production and Performance
Provides students with an engaging and practical experience essential for understanding and synthesizing theoretical and textual work in theatre arts. Students will participate in various aspects of play production including analysis acting, play development, library research, technical theatre, and audience development. Stage work includes rigorous interaction between student, professor, and the text.
May be repeated for a total of twelve (12) units. May not be taken for credit by students who have received credit for TA 489S.
      
TA 495A (1) 495B (2) 495C (3) - Internship
Designed to link the student directly with a selected and approved theatre or individual for the purpose of providing additional creative and/or studio skills as sell as a practical understanding of the discipline.
Graded Credit/No Credit. May be repeated for a total of six (6) units. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.
      
TA 498A (1) 498B (2) 498C (3) - Independent Study
This course is intended for students with advanced standing in respective areas of study. Selected topic(s) must be approved by the Visual and Performing Arts Independent Study Committee and supervised by a faculty member or academic advisor.
May be repeated for a total of six (6) units. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
      
TA 499A (1) 499B (2) 499C (3) - Independent Research
Designed for students with demonstrated capacity for independent research, field, creative and studio work. Research topic must be approved by Visual and Performing Arts Independent Study Committee and supervised by faculty advisor.
May be repeated for a total of six (6) units. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.