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AMD 380-2: Design and Invention
Explores methods of creative development from concept to visual design. Emphasizes the imagination as a tool for invention with visual design as the conduit for both the development and articulation of new concepts. Incorporates studio-based hands-on development and a range of computer graphics technologies. Draws on historical and contemporary examples of invention with an emphasis on the interdisciplinary development of ideas. Explores ways in which design concepts can be realized through design thinking and project work. Includes design activities, research, design management.
 
BIOL 396-8:  Introduction to Medical Etymology, Diagnostics and Procedures
Covers basic medical terminology and the vocabulary of medical specialties. Special emphasis is on the use of prefixes and suffixes, and technical explanations of medical terms and descriptions of anatomy, physiology, and pathology. Students learn to utilize medical terminology as it applies to the structure of the human body, common laboratory tests, radiological and operative procedures, as well as basic pharmacology.
 
BIOL 396-9:  Comparative Animal Physiology Discussion 
This one-hour required discussion accompanies the lab portion of BIOL 353.  Students will work on reading, discussing and presenting on primary literature, as well as group activities to review core lecture concepts.
 
BIOL 396-10:  Genetics Discussion
This one-hour required discussion accompanies the lab portion of BIOL 352.  Students will work on reading, discussing and presenting on primary literature, as well as group activities to review core lecture concepts.
 
BIOL 396-11:  Principles of Ecology Discussion
This one-hour required discussion accompanies the lab portion of BIOL 354.  Students will work on reading, discussing and presenting on primary literature, as well as group activities to review core lecture concepts.
 
BIOL 486-11:  Animal Reproductive Physiology Discussion
This is a weekly discussion session for BIOL 411L.  Students will learn how to: 1) prepare scientific manuscripts in the style of peer-reviewed case reports, using both professional veterinary journal and medical journal formats, 2) conduct instructor-supervised scientific literature searches of both primary and secondary sources to find relevant references to support their case reports and prepare written summaries on them, 3) work as teams to peer review other students’ case report drafts and to discuss their literature search summaries, and 4) students will select a career or graduate program of their choosing that is relevant to the field of reproductive physiology (i.e. human or animal IVF tech, obstetrician, andrologist, etc.), research the qualifications needed and then give presentations on their findings.
 
BIOL 486-12, ST: Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Discussion
This is a weekly discussion session for BIOL 401.  Students will: 1) alternate leading discussions of the current peer-reviewed scientific literature relevant to topics in comparative vertebrate anatomy; 2) alternate leading more detailed and focused prosections of particular anatomical structures to which they are assigned; 3) present a synopsis of their course term project papers to the class.
Co-requisite: BIOL 401.
 
BIOL 486-13, ST: Principles of Bioengineering
Bioengineering uses the tools and principles of physics and engineering to analyze and solve biological problems and create medical applications. Students will learn the basic engineering principles that can be applied in biology.  This class designed for biology and biotechnology students interested in pursuing a PhD or Master’s in engineering or bioengineering. This is the lecture portion of the class, in which we will study basic engineering concepts and their application in biology and medicine.
Prerequisites: Biol 210 and Math 160, both with a grade of C (2.0), OR, enrollment in the Biological Sciences Master's program.
 
BIOL 486-14, ST: Principles of Bioengineering Discussion
Bioengineering uses the tools and principles of physics and engineering to analyze and solve biological problems and create medical applications. This is a discussion session for BIOL 487-4. Students will review and expand upon the engineering principles necessary for understanding the Principles of Bioengineering Lab.
 
BIOL 487-4, ST: Principles of Bioengineering Lab
Focuses on learning the tools to create lab-on-chip designs and imaging. Students will apply these principles to a variety of bioengineering-related experiments.
Prerequisites: Biol 210 and Math 160, both with a grade of C or better, OR, enrollment in the Biological Sciences Master's program.
 
BIOL 596-7, ST: Biological Oceanography
Explores how marine organisms interact with their environment. Promotes understanding that the characteristics, interactions, and processes that influence marine communities and organisms requires an interdisciplinary perspective. Heavily integrates concepts of chemistry, physics, and geology as it interacts with marine life.  Focuses also on oceanographic and atmospheric phenomena at various spatial and temporal scales.
Prerequisite: Biol 354 with a minimum grade of C (2.0).
 
BIOL 596-8, ST: Neurobiology Discussion
This is a weekly discussion session for BIOL 576. Students will 1) learn how to prepare the results of the laboratories in an appropriate manner to present to their peers, 2) conduct instructor-supervised scientific literature searches of both primary and secondary sources to find relevant references to support their presentations, and 3) work as teams to peer review other students’ presentations and to discuss their literature search summaries.
 
BIOT 388-1:  Molecular Biotechnology Discussion
This one-hour required discussion accompanies the lab portion of BIOT 355.  Students will work on reading, discussing and presenting on primary literature, as well as group activities to review core lecture concepts.
 
CS 200-5, ST: Problem Solving for CS 111
Focuses on problem-solving techniques for programmers and computer scientists. Covers how to break seemingly large problems into smaller, manageable subtasks, and strategies for developing and evaluating solutions, verbal reasoning, and troubleshooting programs. This course will be run in parallel to respective lower-division computer science courses.
Credit/No Credit
Optional Co-requisite: CS 111
 
CS 200-6, ST: Problem Solving for CS 211
Focuses on problem-solving techniques for programmers and computer scientists. Covers how to break seemingly large problems into smaller, manageable subtasks, and strategies for developing and evaluating solutions, verbal reasoning, and troubleshooting programs. This course will be run in parallel to respective lower-division computer science courses.
Credit/No Credit
Optional Co-requisite: CS 211
 
CS 200-7, ST: Problem Solving for CS 231
Focuses on problem-solving techniques for programmers and computer scientists. Covers how to break seemingly large problems into smaller, manageable subtasks, and strategies for developing and evaluating solutions, verbal reasoning, and troubleshooting programs. This course will be run in parallel to respective lower-division computer science courses.
Credit/No Credit
Optional Co-requisite: CS 231
 
ST: Hip Hop II
Hip Hop II allows for more experienced students to practice and participate in a global phenomenon that continues to evolve alternatively, experimentally, and commercially. This high energy class imparts the heart of Hip Hop, based in personal expression, political transformation, and social activism. 
Prerequisites: DNCE 203 (Hip Hop I), and consent of Instructor/Program Director.
 
ECON 481-11: Introduction to Spatial Analysis in Economics
Overview of GIS and spatial analysis applied to economic topics. Focus on geographic information, locational decision-making, spatial data, value of GIS and GIS strategies. Students learn through case studies and lab practice with spatial data.
Prerequisites: ECON 201, 202, and MATH 242. Exclude in-progress credit.
 
ECON 481-12: Economics of Crime
Uses economic theory and techniques to analyze crime and punishment.  Introduces a model of the rational criminal, from an economic perspective. Examines crime as a utility-maximizing choice based on incentives, which can be altered through public policy. Economists are interested in how responsive crime is to different policy options. Some topics include societal costs of crime, drug control, gun control, punishment, and deterrence.
Prerequisites: ECON 201 and ECON 202 and MATH 132 or MATH 160; with a minimum grade of C (2.0). Exclude in-progress credit.
 
EDUC 694-8:  Equity & Access in Practicum  (To become EDUC 603)
Explores current research, issues, and theories related to education equity and access. Students will analyze educational equity in K-12 classrooms and schools.
Note: This course will become EDUC 603 after the curricular approval process is completed.
 
EDUC 694-9:  Research in Curriculum and Instruction I  (To become EDUC 617)
Guides students toward building and completing a proposal in the area of curriculum and instruction. Students work to identify an issue or problem about which to inquire, develop research questions, review the related literature, and develop methods of examination.
Note: This course will become EDUC 617 after the curricular approval process is completed.
 
GBST 390-9, ST: Rebellion and Civil War
Explores the theories, concepts and empirical reality of rebellion and civil war. We seek to understand intra- state conflict, both as full blown civil war between state and non-state actors and as violent opposition short of all out civil war.
This course is crosslisted with PSCI 390-24. Students may not receive credit for both.
 
GEOG 190-1: Introduction to Oceanography
Survey of the World Ocean from an Earth System Science perspective. Examines the origin of the oceans, the global geography of contemporary oceans, and the spatial and temporal patterns of key properties such as temperature, salinity, and currents, among others. Examines life in the ocean and the role of oceans in climate and climate change.
Satisfies GE Area B1 credit.
 
LTWR 502-6:  Life Plots: Experience/Identity in 19th C Novel
Critical analysis of major British novels of the nineteenth century in cultural context. Focus on narrative constructions of inner lives, social bodies, and intersectional (gendered, raced, classed, sexed, aged, and dis/abled) identities. Plots of development (bildungsroman or coming of age); love, courtship, marriage, and its discontents; and family relationships, with attention to genre (romance, sensation, the domestic, and the gothic). Instructor consent required.
Prerequisites: LTWR 300A and LTWR 300B and 9 additional units in upper division courses.
 
MUSC 380-3:  Applied Piano
Designed for advanced piano performance focused music majors.  Weekly individual (1:1) lessons in faculty studio.  Development of practice techniques, and concert repertoire. Main course goals are to enhance musicianship, performance skills, playing techniques, develop individuality, and foster intricate and unique musicality.
Prerequisites: MUSC 145, 146 and 240
 
PSCI 390-24, ST: Rebellion and Civil War
Explores the theories, concepts and empirical reality of rebellion and civil war. We seek to understand intra- state conflict, both as full blown civil war between state and non-state actors and as violent opposition short of all out civil war.
This course is crosslisted with GBST 390-9. Students may not receive credit for both.
 
PSYC 440-6:  Developing in the Digital Age
Examines the influences of various media sources on the development of children and adolescents. Investigates television, internet, video games and mobile media use from an empirically supported and cultural platform. Discusses strategies for using technology productively at home and in school and explore techniques for protecting against destructive behaviors and addictions at all levels of intervention.
Prerequisites: (PSYC 100 & 210) OR (PSYC 100 & PSYC 331) OR (PSYC 100 & PSYC 349), all with a C (2.0) or better.