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BIOL 486-7: FISH PHYSIOLOGY

Overview of comparative marine and freshwater fish ecology, biology and physiology. Strong focus on comparative physiology, supported by a focus on fishes from various habitats, including local California fishes and fishes that inhabit extreme environments on Earth. Taught through combination of lectures and interactive class activities, providing overview of fish physiology, and links between environment, climate change, and evolutionary history. Includes embryonic development, cardiovascular system, respiration, responses to temperature, responses to hypoxia and anoxia, diversity of fishes, morphology, taxonomy, and anatomy.

Prerequisites: BIOL 353

 

BIOL 486-8: FISH PHYSIOLOGY DISCUSSION

Discussion course examines chronic and acute physiological responses of fish species, the diversity of fish morphology, the internal anatomy of fishes, the comparative anatomy of male and female fishes, the muscle physiology of fish, and the developmental physiology of fish. Discuss empirical observations to understand basic physiological responses common among species.

Prerequisites: BIOL 353

Co-Requisites: BIOL 486-7 and BIOL 487-2

 

BIOL 486-9: Cell and Tissue Biomechanics

Studies force, motion and strength of dynamic systems, such as molecules, fluids, buildings and even stars and galaxies. Covers principles of mechanics applied to biological systems (cells and tissue) and the physiological and medical applications. Focus on the functioning of living systems, predicting changes due to mechanical alterations and recognizing medical applications.

Prerequisite:  MATH 160

Co-requisites:  BIOL 486-10 and BIOL 487-3

 

BIOL 486-10: Cell and Tissue Biomechanics Discussion

Studies force, motion, and strength of dynamic systems, such as molecules, fluids, buildings, and even stars and galaxies.

Emphasis on quantitative problems in cell and tissue biomechanics. Studies principles of mechanics applies to biological systems (cells and tissue) and the physiological and medical applications.

Focus on the functioning of living systems, predicting changes due to mechanical alterations and recognizing medical applications.

Prerequisite:  MATH 160

Co-requisites: 486-9 and BIOL 487-3

 
BIOL 487-2: Fish Physiology Laboratory

Laboratory course compares chronic and acute physiological responses of fish species, the diversity of fish morphology, the internal anatomy of fishes, the comparative anatomy of male and female fishes, the muscle physiology of fish, and the developmental physiology of fish. Uses empirical observation to understand basic physiological responses common among species. Students will complete class-long experiments and combine chronic and acute responses to understand how fish respond to environmental change.

Prerequisites: BIOL 353

Co-requisites: BIOL 486-7 and BIOL 486-8

 

BIOL 487-3: Cell and Tissue Biomechanics LAB

Studies force, motion and strength of dynamic systems, such as molecules, fluids, buildings and even stars and galaxies.

Uses experiments to observe and study the principles of mechanics applied to biological systems (cells and tissue). Focuses on the functioning of living systems, predicting changes due to mechanical alterations and recognizing medical applications.

Prerequisite:  MATH 160

Co-reqs: BIOL 486-9 and BIOL 486-10

 
BIOL 596-3:  AVIAN BIOLOGY

Studies birds, encompassing traditional ornithology and applied avian ecology, covering the fundamentals of avian systematics, evolution, anatomy, physiology, reproduction, behavior, ecology, and conservation. Major topics include dinosaur origins, flight mechanics and physiology, foraging and feeding behavior, social interactions, life-history strategies, and population dynamics.

Prerequisites: BIOL 354 and BIOL 353, or enrollment in the Biological Sciences graduate program.

 

BIOL 596-4: Advanced Topics in Current Biological Research

Advanced seminar, offering training in the critical evaluation of biological research that is presented in both oral and written forms. Special emphasis on learning about and interpreting experimental methods to investigate current topics in biological research. Comprised of a combination of guest lectures delivered by research scientists and discussion of primary papers related to the lecturer’s area of research. Specific topics will span the biological disciplines ecology, physiology, and molecular and cell biology.

Prerequisites: Enrollment in the Master’s of Science in Biological Sciences program or minimum grade of C (2.0) in at least two of the following courses: BIOL 351, 352, 353, 354.

 

BIOL 596-6:  Avian Biology Discussion

Focus on providing additional hands-on experience with the tools and techniques of ornithology and avian ecology in the lab and field, presentations, and/or topical discussions of the relevant scientific literature. One hour of field/laboratory.

Co-requisites: BIOL 596-3 and BIOL 597-4.

 

BIOL 597-4: Avian Biology Lab and Field Studies

 Focus on providing direct, hands-on experience with the tools and techniques of ornithology and avian ecology. Three hours of laboratory. Field trip(s) during or outside of class (including weekends), on or off-campus, may be required.

Co-requisites: BIOL 596-3 and BIOL 596-6.

 

BIOL 596-5:  Research Methods in Molecular Evolution and Ecology

Application of modern molecular tools to identify and study ecological and evolutionary relationships.  Two hours lecture.  

Prerequisites: BIOL 352 and BIOL 354, or enrollment in the Biological Sciences graduate program.

Co-requisite: BIOL 597-5

 

BIOL 597-5:  Research Methods in Molecular Evolution and Ecology LAB

Application of modern molecular tools to identify and study ecological and evolutionary relationships.  Three hours laboratory activity.  Mandatory periodic field trips.

Prerequisites:  BIOL 352 and BIOL 354, or enrollment in the Biological Sciences graduate program.

Co-requisite:  BIOL 595-5

 
BIOL 686-9: Advanced Fish Physiology

Overview of comparative marine and freshwater fish biology and physiology. Strong focus on comparative physiology, supported by a focus on fishes from various habitats, including local California fishes and fishes that inhabit extreme environments on Earth. Providing overview of fish physiology, and links between environment, climate change, and evolutionary history. Includes embryonic development, cardiovascular system, respiration, responses to temperature, responses to hypoxia and anoxia, diversity of fishes, morphology, taxonomy, and anatomy. Students will be required to read peer-reviewed literature and write an expanded academic paper on a fish physiology topic.

Enrollment restricted to students in the Biological Sciences graduate program.

 

BIOL 686-10:  Cell and Tissue Biomechanics Lecture

Covers the principles of mechanics applied to biological systems (cells and tissue) and the physiological and medical applications. This knowledge will help us understand the function of living systems, predict changes due to mechanical alterations and recognize medical applications.

Prerequisite: Enrollment restricted to students in the Biological Sciences graduate program.

Co-requisites: BIOL 686-11 and BIOL 687-1

 

BIOL 686-11:  Cell and Tissue Biomechanics Discussion

Covers solving quantitative problems in cell and tissue biomechanics. Emphasis on the principles of mechanics applied to biological systems (cells and tissue) and the physiological and medical applications. Focus on the functioning of living systems, predicting changes due to mechanical alterations and recognizing medical applications. Prerequisite: Enrollment restricted to students in the Biological Sciences graduate program.

Co-requisites: BIOL 686-10 and BIOL 687-1

 

BIOL 687-1: Cell and Tissue Biomechanics Lab

Perform experiments to observe and study the principles of mechanics applied to biological systems (cells and tissue). Focus on the functioning of living systems, predicting changes due to mechanical alterations, and recognizing medical applications.

Prerequisite: Enrollment restricted to students in the Biological Sciences graduate program.

Co-requisites: BIOL 686-10 and BIOL 686-11

 

ENTR 482-3: Technology Entrepreneurship

Introduction to a number of innovative technologies that can be deployed in the creation of a new venture opportunity (e.g. App development, artificial intelligence, machine learning, virtual reality, and blockchain). The lectures, speakers, materials and workshops will help students build “technical credibility” and basic fluency of these concepts. Provides hands-on experiences in digital prototyping and an introduction to app development. Students will use these skills and knowledge to develop and test a new business opportunity.

 

MDIA 470-2:  Media Policy and the Struggle for U.S. Democracy, 1776-1996

Explores the history of media policy in the U.S., from the nation’s founding to the birth of the modern Internet. Considers the relationship between laws and regulations governing media and democratic participation. Pays particular attention to media policymaking and movements for racial, gender and economic justice.

 

MIS 484-6:  Cloud Management

Introduces the concepts of cloud computing and cloud management to students and dives into the details of various cloud service delivery models that students may encounter in their careers.  Utilizes hands-on lab activities to familiarize students with different cloud technologies and leads to a final course project where students develop a cloud business case for a fictional organization and present to executives for approval.

Prerequisites:  MIS 302 or MIS 304.

 

OM 484-4: Advanced Business Analytics

Introduces advanced business analytics concepts and tools that are used in various business applications. Consists of three distinct parts: descriptive analytics, predictive analytics, and prescriptive analytics.

Subjects include visual analytics, dashboard design, data mining for business application, prescriptive modeling, multi-criteria decision making.

Enrollment restricted to students who have completed the lower-division pre-business core requirement (major status in Business Administration, i.e., attained business status).

Prerequisite: BUS 324 with a minimum grade of C (2.0).

 

SOC 490-12: Career Readiness for Criminology and Justice Studies Majors

Explores the multi-faceted career paths for criminology and justice majors, with resources, readings, and activities to prepare students for Post-graduation employment and graduate school. Includes the exploration of diversity in culture, social structures, groups and human interaction.  Develops skills and awareness that will lead students to employment in the public, private sector, grassroots organizations, and social justice campaigns. Also explores relevant professional degrees such as MAs, PhDs, and JDs. Includes lectures, films, guest presentations and field trips to broaden their understanding of professions and occupations for criminology and justice studies majors.

 

VSAR 380-12:  AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN IN CONTEMPORARY VISUAL CULTURE

Investigates the powerful contributions that African American women are making in diverse realms of contemporary visual culture to include film, video, photography, performance, textiles and more. Analyzes their representations of the complexities, struggles and joys of African American history, culture, family and self – and the visual strategies they use to counteract misrepresentations with power, beauty and grace.

 

VSAR 380-4: DIGITAL DRAWING

Develops digital drawing skills with 21st Century tools and techniques on the computer and mobile devices. Students will master a range of advanced drawing skills while completing digital drawing projects. Projects are designed to strengthen the skills to represent the illusion of the three-dimensional world on a two-dimensional surface and to develop the ability to compose a drawing that unites form with content that is derived from personal and cultural subject matter.

Recommended preparation (one of the following preferred):

  • VSAR130 Visual Arts Fundamentals
  • VSAR131 Drawing I
  • VSAR311 Drawing II
  • or equivalent 2-D design or Drawing class from other colleges

 

Information provided by the Office of Catalog & Curriculum